The Tudor Society
  • Medieval and Tudor Musical Instruments Quiz

    How much do you know about medieval and Tudor musical instruments?

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  • Elizabeth I’s 1545 letter to her father

    In today’s Claire Chats video, I share with you a letter that the twelve year-old Elizabeth, future Elizabeth I, wrote to her father Henry VIII in December 1545 to preface her trilingual (Latin, French and Italian) translation of Queen Catherine Parr’s “Prayers and meditations”.

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  • Gloriana and the Green Ruby by Heather R. Darsie

    Gloriana, Elizabeth I, is the famous Virgin Queen of England. She never took a husband. Much speculation has swirled around Elizabeth’s decision to remain single. Several tragic, if not traumatic, events are cited as reasons why Elizabeth chose not to marry.

    Elizabeth was born on 7 September 1533. On 19 May 1536, when Elizabeth was not quite three years of age, her mother, Anne Boleyn, was beheaded by order of her father. Elizabeth, a precocious child, asked following the fall of her mother, “how haps it governor, yesterday my Lady Princess, today but my Lady Elizabeth?”. Elizabeth’s first step-mother, Jane Seymour, died of puerperal fever in 1537 only days after giving birth to Elizabeth’s little half-brother. Elizabeth was four years old. Katherine Howard, a cousin of Elizabeth’s on her mother’s side and Elizabeth’s third step-mother, was beheaded for high treason for her “dissolute life previous to her marriage” in February 1542. Elizabeth was eight years old.

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  • 11 September 1572 – A celebration for the defeat of the Ottoman Troops and the massacre of the Huguenots

    Pope Gregory XIII ordered a joint celebration or commemoration on 11th September 1572 for the defeat of the Ottoman troops by the Holy League at the Battle of Lepanto on 7th October 1571, and for the St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of the Huguenots in France, in August 1572.

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  • Battle of Pinkie Cleugh – 10 September 1547

    The Battle of Pinkie Cleugh, also known as the Battle of Pinkie, took place near Musselburgh, in Scotland, on the banks of the River Esk, on 10th September 1547. It was a battle of the “War of the Rough Wooing”, so called because it started when Henry VIII tried to force Scotland to agree to a marriage between his son Edward and the infant Mary, Queen of Scots.

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  • October magazine cover reveal

    We’re just putting the finishing touches to our October magazine, which as always will be packed with Tudor articles from some amazing historians! Here is the cover teaser reveal…

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  • 9 September 1513 – The Battle of Flodden

    On the 9th September 1513, while Henry VIII was away, busy campaigning against the French, James IV and his Scottish troops crossed the border and challenged the English force, which was headed by Thomas Howard, the Earl of Surrey, at Flodden in Northumberland.

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  • The Battle of Flodden videos

    In the BBC series Two Men in a Trench, archaeologists Tony Pollard and Neil Oliver visited the site of the Battle of Flodden in an attempt to bring the past to life. Here are YouTube videos of that episode:

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  • 8 September 1560 – The Death of Amy Dudley

    On 8th September 1560, Amy Dudley (née Robsart), wife of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, died at her rented home, Cumnor Place in Oxfordshire.

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  • Happy Birthday Elizabeth I

    Today is the 482nd anniversary of Elizabeth I’s birth on 7th September 1533, so Happy Birthday Elizabeth!

    Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn, and she was born at the Palace of Placentia, or Greenwich Palace.

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  • This week in history 7 – 13 September

    On this day in history events for 7 – 13 September.

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  • Catherine Parr Quiz

    Catherine Parr was a fascinating lady, but how much do you know about this queen consort of Henry VIII?

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  • Catherine Parr by Sarah Bryson

    Catherine was born in 1512, most likely in London or Buckinghamshire. Her parents were Sir Thomas Parr, a favourite of King Henry VIII during his early reign, and Maud Parr, who served as a lady-in-waiting to Henry VIII’s first wife Katherine of Aragon. It is believed that Catherine was named after the Queen. Catherine had a younger brother named William, born in 1513 and a younger sister named Anne born in 1515.

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  • Robert Dudley – His Last Letter video

    In today’s Claire Chats, on the anniversary of Robert Dudley’s death on 4th September 1588, I talk about his death, the very last letter he wrote to Elizabeth I and her reaction to news of his death.

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  • 4 September 1588 – Death of Robert Dudley

    Today is the anniversary of the death of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. He died on 4th September 1588 at his lodge at Cornbury, near Woodstock in Oxfordshire.

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  • September’s Expert Talk – Gareth Russell on the End of the Tudor Era

    Back by popular demand, historian and author Gareth Russell is our September speaker. Gareth is the author of A History of the English Monarchy,An Illustrated Introduction to the Tudors and The Emperors: How Europe’s Greatest Rulers Were Destroyed by World War I, and he is currently working on a biography of Catherine Howard, Henry VIII’s fifth wife. He is a wonderful speaker and we’ve enjoyed hosting him here before.

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  • This week in history 31 August – 6 September

    On this day in history events for 31st August to 6th September.

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  • The Martyrdom of Robert Samuel, Preacher, suffering for the true defence of Christ’s Gospel

    “The Martyrdom of Robert Samuel, Preacher, suffering for the true defence of Christ’s Gospel” is the title of the chapter of martyrologist John Foxe’s account of the imprisonment and death of Robert Samuel, former minister of East Bergholt Church in Suffolk, who was burned at the stake on 31st August 1555. Samuel was one of the Ipswich Martyrs, one of nine people who were executed between 1515 and 1558 for their Lollard or Protestant beliefs.

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  • Transcript from live chat with Susan Higginbotham

    For those who were not able to get to our live chat with Susan Higginbotham – you really missed a special chat – here is the transcript where we discuss John Dudley.

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  • British Monarchy Quiz

    Today we’re broadening our focus to the kings and queens of Great Britain. Test your knowledge with this fun quiz.

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  • “Gloriana”: Elizabeth I’s final years by Gareth Russell

    As part of Gareth Russell’s book tour for “A History of the English Monarchy: From Boadicea to Elizabeth I”, I’m delighted to welcome Gareth to the Tudor Society today, which is his home from home anyway! I hope you enjoy his article and please see the bottom of this post for details on how to enter the giveaway for a copy of his wonderful book. Over to Gareth…

    Elizabeth I’s decline began in her moment of apotheosis. The defeat of the Spanish Armada coincided with the death of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. In the middle of the victory celebrations, the Queen received the news that her childhood friend-turned-adult-love had passed away and she was heartbroken. It has long been surmised that Elizabeth would have married Leicester had he not already been married and his first wife, Amy Dudley (née Robsart), had not then been found dead in circumstances that looked suspiciously like murder or suicide. However, during a bout of serious illness when she thought she was about to die, Elizabeth made a point of denying that she had ever taken Leicester into her bed, no matter how much she loved him. Despite mountains of speculation then and since, there is in fact no firm evidence at all to suggest that Elizabeth I was not a virgin as she claimed. The risk of pregnancy, the loss of her reputation, death in childbed or yielding her authority to a man made celibacy by far her safest choice. We will never know, of course, what happened every day and night of her life, but it is worth pointing out that it should not be taken as axiomatic, as it too often is, that Elizabeth Tudor lied about her life-long virginity.

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  • Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon – Shakespeare’s Resting Place

    In today’s Claire Chats, I share with you some information on Holy Trinity Church, where Shakespeare was baptised and buried, along with photos Tim took on our recent visit.

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  • Letter from Princess Mary to her brother Edward VI – August 1551

    The following letter was written by Princess Mary, the future Mary I, to her brother Edward VI on 19th August 1551. Henry Ellis, editor of “Original Letters, Illustrative of English History…” explains:

    “The following Letter from the Princess Mary to her brother, is preserved upon the Books of the Privy Council. It is probably the best specimen which we have in our power to give of her talent at writing: and, with the singular Paper which follows it by way of comment, will show her to have been a woman of more intellect than the world has usually supposed. Queen Catherine Parr took great pains in the education both of Mary and Elizabeth.

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  • Taster: September 2015 Magazine

    Here is a taster of the September 2015 Tudor Life magazine. Inside you’ll find 68 pages packed with Tudor facts, features and fun. This month we have a special feature section on MOVIES, and you’d be amazed what you’ll learn about the truth behind the movies in this month’s edition

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  • September 2015 Tudor Life Magazine

    Lights, Camera, Action… September is “movie month” for the Tudor Life magazine. We’ve gone crazy with everything film related – but of course it is all in relation to the real history of the times!

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  • Childbirth in Medieval and Tudor Times by Sarah Bryson

    Childbirth is openly discussed in today’s society. Images of pregnant women appear in magazines and women giving birth can be seen on television and in movies. Yet during the medieval period, childbirth was deemed a private affair. Giving birth in the middle ages was a dangerous time for women and childbirth did not discriminate. Young mothers, older mothers, poor or rich mothers, all could die not only in childbirth but also due to complications afterwards. Sadly, more than one in three women died during their child-bearing years.

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  • 27 August 1549 – The Battle of Dussindale

    On 27th August 1549, the Battle of Dussindale took place, ending Kett’s Rebellion in Norfolk.

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  • Coming up on the Tudor Society

    Historian Gareth Russell is the editor of our monthly Tudor Life magazine and he’s been working hard on scheduling expert articles and also expert talks for the next few months. We are thrilled to bits that so many historians and authors want to be involved in the Tudor Society by offering their knowledge and expertise to our members – a big thank you to them and to all our members too for your continued support.

    Contributors to Tudor Life magazine in the coming months include:

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  • Susan Higginbotham’s Live Chat – 28 August 2015

    Just a reminder that Susan Higginbotham’s live chat is taking place on the Tudor Society chatroom this Friday (28th August) at 9pm US Eastern time.

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  • A History of the English Monarchy Book Tour

    Just to let you know that author and Tudor Life magazine editor Gareth Russell has embarked on a week long book/blog tour for his non-fiction history book A History of the English Monarchy: From Boadicea to Elizabeth I. He will be stopping here at the Tudor Society on 30th August but do catch him at his other stops too to enter the giveaways for a copy of his book.

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