The Tudor Society
  • Jane Seymour Quiz

    This week, Rebecca tests out knowledge of Jane Seymour, second wife of Henry VIII and mother of Edward VI. Good luck!

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  • Get your live-streaming ticket for Saturday 24 September!

    As you know, Tim and I are going to be in London on Saturday night for MadeGlobal Publishing’s “An Evening with the Authors” along with Tudor Life magazine contributors like Gareth Russell, Kyra Kramer, Jane Moulder, Beth von Staats, Melanie V Taylor… and lots of other authors and historians from the medieval and Tudor world (well, modern day world!).

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  • Henry VIII e-book now available

    The second book in our series of Tudor Monarchs e-books is now available for Tudor Society members to download.

    Articles from a wide variety of authors and historians take us through the fascinating life and times of Henry VIII.

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  • 22 September 1515 – Birth of Anne of Cleves, Henry VIII’s fourth wife

    On this day in history, 22nd September 1515, Anna von Jülich-Kleve-Berg, or Anne of Cleves as we know her, was born near Düsseldorf. She was the second daughter of John III, Duke of Jülich, Cleves and Berg, an important German ruler, and his wife, Maria of Jülich-Berg.

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  • October Tudor Life Magazine Taster

    Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, is an intriguing character. In this month’s Tudor Life magazine our experts examine many interesting aspects of her life.

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  • October 2016 Tudor Life Magazine

    Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, is an intriguing character. In this month’s Tudor Life magazine our experts examine many interesting aspects of her life.

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  • The marriage of Robert Dudley and Lettice Devereux

    On the morning of Sunday 21st September 1578, between seven and eight o’clock, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, married Lettice Devereux (née Knollys), widow of Walter Devereux, Earl of Essex, at his house in Wanstead, Essex.

    Leicester’s chaplain, Humphrey Tindall officiated, and the guests at this secret and private ceremony included Sir Francis Knollys, father of the bride; Richard Knollys, the bride’s brother; Ambrose Dudley, Earl of Warwick and brother of Leicester; and Leicester’s friends, the Earl of Pembroke and Lord North.

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  • Her Brother’s Keeper: Marguerite of Navarre Rescues Francis I from the Emperor by Heather R. Darsie

    On 24 February 1525, the Battle of Pavia was fought as part of the Italian Wars that began in 1521 and ended in 1526. The French troops, led by King Francis I, fought against the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V’s Imperial army, which was reinforced by Spanish troops. The battle lasted around four hours, with the French taking heavy casualties. Francis himself was taken captive and eventually forced to sign the Treaty of Madrid. It also decisively removed the French threat to Hapsburg Italy.

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  • Tudor Cooking with Claire – Lombard Slices (Leche Lombarde)

    In this edition of Tudor Cooking with Claire, I make Lombard Slices, also known as Leche Lombarde, a medieval sweetmeat. In the video, I read the original recipe which is found in Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books and here it is:

    “Take fayre Hony, and clarifi yt on the fyre tylle it wexe hard, then take hard yolkys of Eyroun, & kryme a gode quantyte ther-to, tyl it be styf y-now; an thenne take it vppe, & ley it on a borde; then take fayre gratyd Brede, & pouder pepir, & molde it to-gederys with thine hondys, tylle it be so styf that it wole ben lechyd; then leche it; then take wyne & pouder Gyngere, Canelle, & a lytil claryfyid hony, & late renne thorw a straynour, & caste this Syryp ther-on, when thou shalt serue it out, instede of Clerye.”

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  • Elizabeth Woodville chat – 7 October 2016

    Olga Hughes, who you will know from her regular column in Tudor Life magazine, has kindly offered to run a live chat on Elizabeth Woodville on the Tudor Society chatroom on Friday 7th October (or Saturday 8th depending on your time zone). This will be an informal chat, like the one we had this month of Henry VII, and will be a chance to get together and discuss this queen consort of Edward IV.

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  • This week in history 19 – 25 September

    On this day in Tudor history events for week 19th to 25th September.

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  • Katherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk’s memorial

    Today is the anniversary of the death of Katherine Willoughby, Duchess of Suffolk, who is also known by her married names of Brandon and Bertie.

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  • The Six Wives of Henry VIII:Monarchy and Matrimony in Tudor England

    MedievalCourses.com has just launched a new course by Gareth Russell, editor of the Tudor Society’s Tudor Life magazine and author of The Emperors: How Europe’s Rulers Were Destroyed by the First World War, A History of the English Monarchy: From Boadicea to Elizabeth I and the forthcoming Young and Damned and Fair: The Life and Tragedy of Catherine Howard at the Court of Henry VIII.

    Although I’m biased, being involved in MedievalCourse.com, I can hand-on-heart say that this is an excellent course. Gareth has done a brilliant job in creating and narrating each of the seven units and what I really love about this course is that he doesn’t look at the same old topics regarding these wives, he “uses each wife to explore a different aspect of monarchy in Tudor England” and then finishes with a unit considering why these women remain so popular and how they have “been re-invented and revitalised by the age of Hollywood, television and best-selling novels”. Bravo, Gareth, you’ve done a wonderful job!

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  • Tudor History Quiz

    This week’s quiz from Rebecca Larson is a general Tudor history quiz. Good luck and enjoy!

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  • 18 September 1544 – Henry VIII is triumphant in Boulogne

    On this day in history, 18th September 1544, Henry VIII rode triumphantly through the streets of Boulogne after the French surrendered, ending the Siege of Boulogne, which had started on 19th July 1544. The English forces then set about fortifying the town.

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  • Building work at Greenwich Palace 1532-1533

    In today’s Claire Chats video I share with you my latest book buy – a transcript of building work that was carried out at Greenwich Palace between September 1532, after Anne Boleyn had become Marquis of Pembroke, and September 1533, after she’d become queen and given birth to her daughter, Elizabeth I, at the palace.

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  • 14 September 1538 – The Destruction of the Shrine of Our Lady of Caversham

    On this day in history, 14th September 1538, the Shrine of Our Lady of Caversham, near Reading, was destroyed by Dr John London, on the orders of Henry VIII. The shrine had been established in 1106.

    London wrote to Thomas Cromwell on 17th September to confirm the shrine’s destruction:

    “Has pulled down the image of Our Lady at Caversham, whereunto was great pilgrimage. It is plated over with silver. Has put it in a chest fast locked and nailed up, and will send it by next barge to London. Has pulled down the place she stood in with the lights, shrowds, crutches, images of wax &c. about the chapel, and defaced the same thoroughly. This chapel belonged to Notley Abbey and there was always a canon of that monastery warden of Caversham, who sang in chapel and had the offerings. He was accustomed to show many pretty relics, among others the holy dagger that killed King Henry, and the holy knife that killed St. Edward. All these with the coats of this image, her cap and hair, my servant will bring your Lordship next week. Has sent the canon home to Notley and made fast the doors of the chapel, the lead of which, if desired, he will make sure for the King: otherwise it will be stolen by night,—as happened at the Friars, where they took the clappers of the bells, and but for the aid of Mr. Fachell and the mayor they would have made no little spoil. Reading, 17 Sept.”

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  • William Cecil and John Cheke

    On this day in history, 13th September 1520, William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley and Elizabeth I’s chief advisor, was born Bourne in Lincolnshire. He was the son of Richard Cecil, former Groom of the Robes, Constable of Warwick Castle and High Sheriff of Rutland, and his wife Jane Heckington. His grandfather, David Cecil, had been one of Henry VIII’s favourites, and was High Sheriff of Nottingham.

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  • This week in history 12 – 18 September

    On this day in history events for week 12th to 18th September.

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  • Thomas Seymour Quiz

    Thank you to Rebecca Larson, our new quiz writer, for this quiz on Thomas Seymour. Test your knowledge of this fascinating Tudor man with this fun quiz.

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  • 10 September – A royal christening and a battle

    On this day in history there were two important Tudor events: the christening of Princess Elizabeth, daughter of King Henry VIII and Queen Anne Boleyn, in 1533 and the Battle of Pinkie between England and Scotland in 1547.

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  • Great Fire of London 1666

    Between 2nd and 5th September 1666 fire swept through the City of London destroying many buildings, including St Paul’s Cathedral. To mark the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire an enormous structure representing the 17th century London skyline was set alight on the River Thames in London.

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  • Cause of the 1665 Great Plague confirmed

    I know this isn’t Tudor, but it is fascinating nevertheless. According to a BBC news report, DNA testing has confirmed the identity of the bacteria that was behind the Great Plague of London in 1665.

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  • The Battle of Flodden

    On this day in history, 9th September 1513, while Henry VIII was away, busy campaigning against the French, James IV and his Scottish troops crossed the border and challenged the English force, which was headed by Thomas Howard, the Earl of Surrey, at Flodden in Northumberland.

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  • Fliers for MadeGlobal’s “An Evening with the Authors” 24 Sept

    Many of the Tudor Society members will be at MadeGlobal’s “An Evening with the Authors” event on 24 September in central London, and it would be so lovely to see you there.

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  • Informal live chat on the chatroom – Friday 9 September

    Instead of doing a Claire Chats video this Friday I am going to be running and moderating a live chat on the Tudor Society chatroom. I know that some of you find it hard to come to the expert live chats due to time zone issues, so I’m scheduling this one for a later time.

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  • Transcript of Lauren Browne’s Live Chat

    Thanks to all who attended our live chat with Lauren Browne last night, it was a great chat with an amazing number of people attending. We had people from the UK, Australia and the United States.

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  • This week in history 5 – 11 September

    5 September

    Catherine Parr's tomb

    Catherine Parr's tomb

    1548 - Catherine Parr, Queen Dowager, wife of Thomas Seymour and widow of Henry VIII, died aged around 36 at Sudeley Castle. She had given birth to her first child, a daughter Mary, on 30th August, but within a few days of the birth, she had contracted puerperal fever. You can read an article about her burial on the Anne Boleyn Files - click here - and you can read Catherine Parr related articles on the Tudor Society by clicking here.
    1558 (5th or 6th September) – Death of Sir Robert Broke, judge, legal writer and Speaker of the House of Commons, at a friend's house in Patshull, Staffordshire. He was buried in Claverley Church, Shropshire. Broke also served as Deputy Chief Steward for the Duchy of Lancaster, Serjeant-at-Law and Chief Justice of the Common Pleas.
    1569 – Death of Edmund Bonner, Bishop of London and a man nicknamed “Bloody Bonner”, in Marshalsea Prison. He was buried at St George's, Southwark, but it is thought that his remains were later moved to Copford, near Colchester, a manor held by Bonner as Bishop of London. In Mary I's reign, he was in charge of burning reformers in London, hence his nickname “Bloody Bonner”. Bonner was imprisoned in Elizabeth I's reign for refusing to follow the “Book of Common Prayer” in his services, and for refusing to take the “Oath of Supremacy”.

    6 September

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  • Tudor Executions Quiz Part 2

    Today we have the second and final part of our Tudor executions quiz. How much do you know about the people executed in the reigns of the Tudor monarchs? Test your knowledge with this fun quiz. Good luck!

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  • Can you join me on the chatroom?

    In this week’s Claire Chats I invite you to join me in the chatroom soon for a live chat. Please watch and then leave a comment below – thank you!

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