The Tudor Society
The Tudor Society
  • 20 October – Pontefract Castle surrenders, but all is not as it seems…

    On this day in Tudor history, 20th October 1536, Thomas Darcy, 1st Baron Darcy, owner of Pontefract Castle in Yorkshire, yielded his castle to the rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace. However, all was not as it seemed, as Darcy and others on the castle were actually sympathetic to the rebel cause.

    Find out more about the situation at Pontefract Castle in October 1536, the letters Darcy wrote to King Henry VIII, and what happened on the night of 19th October and morning of 20th October, and why Darcy came to a sticky end, in today’s talk.

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  • 4 October – The Pilgrimage of Grace Rebellion is underway!

    On this day in Tudor history, Wednesday 4th October 1536, trouble erupted in Horncastle, Lincolnshire. This was part of what we know as the Lincolnshire Rising which, in turn, was part of the famous Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion.

    In today’s talk, I share exactly what happened in Horncastle, which included two murders, what the rebellion was all about, and how King Henry VIII responded to the rebel’s grievances. I read King Henry VIII’s own words to the rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace.

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  • 14 June – Sir Christopher Danby, a lucky man

    Not many men who are implicated in rebellions manage to keep their head, but Sir Christopher Danby died a natural death on this day in Tudor history, 14th June 1571.

    Who was Danby? What was he involved in? And how did he survive?

    Let me tell you a bit more about this Tudor man in today’s video.

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  • 30 November – York remembers Robert Aske

    Thank you so much to Kate Cartwright for alerting me to this news. On Friday 30th November, between 11am and 12.30pm, the Bishop of Middlesbrough, the Rt Rev Terence Drainey, is going to be unveiling a plaque in honour of Robert Aske, a lawyer who was one of the leaders of the Pilgrimage of Grace Rebellion of 1536, outside Clifford’s Tower in York.

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  • The 1536 Pilgrimage of Grace Rebellion

    On this day in history, Wednesday 4th October 1536, there was trouble in Horncastle, Lincolnshire. This was part of what we know as the Lincolnshire Rising which, in turn, was part of the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion.

    [Read More...]
  • 3 December 1536 – A king’s pardon for the Pilgrimage of Grace rebels

    henry-viii-and-pilgrimageOn this day in history, 3rd December 1536, a proclamation was made to the rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace offering them a pardon. It read:

    "Proclamation of the King's pardon to the rebels of the different districts, viz. : That those of Yorkshire, with the city of York, Kingston upon Hull, Marshland, Holdenshire, Hexham, Beverley, Holderness, &c., on their submission to Charles duke of Suffolk, president of the council and lieutenant general in Lincolnshire, at Lincoln or elsewhere that he may appoint, shall have free pardons granted to them under the Great Seal without further bill or warrant or paying anything for the Great Seal. Richmond, 3 Dec., 28 Henry VIII."

    The same proclamation was also made in "Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, York, city of York, bishopric of Durham, &c., and in the parts north of Lancaster, on their submission to Henry earl of Cumberland".

    Henry VIII had also consented to the rebels' demand for a free Parliament to be held at York. The rebellion dispersed, but a further rebellion led by Sir Francis Bigod broke out in Yorkshire. Robert Aske tried to prevent it but Bigod went ahead. Bigod’s Rebellion failed and Bigod was arrested. Robert Aske and other men involved in the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion – such as Lord Darcy, Thomas Percy and Robert Constable – were arrested, convicted of treason and executed.

    You can read more about the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion in the following articles:

    Notes and Sources

    • Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, xi. 1235.
  • November Tudor Life Magazine Taster

    Health is the theme of this month’s Tudor Life magazine. It’s jam packed with articles on health and disease, plus a fun quiz where you can find out what might have killed you in the Tudor era!

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  • October Tudor Life Magazine Taster

    Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, is an intriguing character. In this month’s Tudor Life magazine our experts examine many interesting aspects of her life.

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  • October 2016 Tudor Life Magazine

    Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, is an intriguing character. In this month’s Tudor Life magazine our experts examine many interesting aspects of her life.

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  • 12 July 1537 – The execution of Robert Aske

    On this day in history, 12th July 1537, Robert Aske, lawyer and rebel, was hanged in chains outside Clifford’s Tower, the keep of York Castle. Aske was one of the leaders of the rebels in the 1536 northern uprising known as the Pilgrimage of Grace – click here to see a Pilgrimage of Grace timeline and here to read an article on the rebellion.

    Being hanged in chains was an awful way to die. Those executed this way were usually hanged alive in chains – rather than being hanged first in the usual manner and then put in chains on display – and took several days to die, being slowly suffocated to death. Horrible!

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  • 4 October 1536 – The Lincolnshire Rising

    On Wednesday 4th October 1536, there was trouble in Horncastle, Lincolnshire. This was part of what we know as the Lincolnshire Rising which, in turn, was part of the Pilgrimage of Grace rebellion.

    Dr Raynes, the chancellor of the Bishop of Lincoln, who was staying nearby at Bolingbroke, after having held a session of the commissionary’s court there, was dragged from his sickbed and taken to Horncastle. Francis Aidan Gasquet, the 19th century Benedictine monk and historical scholar, describes what happened next in his book “Henry VIII and the English Monasteries”:

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  • The Pilgrimage of Grace by Sarah Bryson

    The Pilgrimage of Grace initially formed as a series of revolts which originated in Lincolnshire. The people were unhappy with the dissolution of their Abbey in Louth, upset with many of the government commissions in the area which were being conducted to look at the resources that the smaller monasteries had as well as the conduct of the clergy. There was also widespread rumour that the government would confiscate the jewels, plate and wealth of the monasteries and also impose new taxes upon the people.

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  • The Pilgrimage of Grace – A Timeline

    A timeline of the main events of the Pilgrimage of Grace Rebellion in 1536.

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