The Tudor Society
The Tudor Society
  • 11 February – The birth and death of Elizabeth of York

    Fancy dying on your birthday! Well, that’s what happened to Elizabeth of York, queen consort of King Henry VII, founder of the Tudor dynasty.

    In today’s video, I tell you all about this Tudor queen, from her birth on this day in 1466 to her death on this day in 1503.

    [Read More...]
  • Elizabeth of York in 60 seconds

    “Why did I limit myself to 60 seconds?” I keep asking myself! It’s so tricky to do any justice at all to these Tudor people in that time, but I hope that these videos do give people enough basic information to make them want to find out more.

    [Read More...]
  • 18 January 1486 – The marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York

    On this day in history, 18th January 1486, the twenty-nine-year-old Henry VII married the twenty-year-old Elizabeth of York.

    They made a striking couple. Elizabeth of York had classic English Rose looks – blonde hair, blue eyes and fair skin – and Henry was tall, slim, dark haired and handsome. They were the perfect couple, and their marriage brought hope to the country. It reconciled the warring Houses of Lancaster and York, and began a new royal house and era: the Tudor dynasty.

    [Read More...]
  • 25 November 1487 – Elizabeth of York is crowned queen

    On 25th November 1487, St Catherine’s Day, Elizabeth of York, consort of Henry VII and mother of one-year-old Arthur Tudor, was crowned queen at Westminster Abbey. As Elizabeth’s biographer Amy Licence explains, her coronation had been postponed due to her pregnancy and then unrest in England.

    [Read More...]
  • August Tudor Life Magazine Taster

    Tudor Life August 2016 is packed with an incredible 68 pages, including a feature section on the Early Tudor period. We hope you’ll join the society to enjoy ALL of our magazines, including all of the back issues!

    [Read More...]
  • Mary Tudor, Queen of France, by Sarah Bryson

    On 18th March 1496, Queen Elizabeth of York, wife of King Henry VII, gave birth to a healthy baby girl at Richmond Palace. The little girl was named Mary and her birth was recorded by Elizabeth in her Psalter. Lady Margaret Beaufort, the King’s mother, also recorded Mary’s birth in her Book of Hours. On 18th March, Margaret recorded: “Hodie nata Maria tertia filia Henricis VII 1495”, or “Today, ws born Mary, the third daughter of Henry VII 1495.” Although Margaret recorded the date as 1495, this is because the new calendar year did not start in Tudor times until Lady Day, 25th March, so we’d say that she was born in 1496.

    [Read More...]
  • Elizabeth of York by Sarah Bryson

    On 11th of February 1466, Elizabeth of York was born at the Palace of Westminster. Exactly thirty seven years later, at the Tower of London, Elizabeth died shortly after giving birth to her last child.

    Elizabeth of York was the eldest child of King Edward IV and his wife Queen Elizabeth Woodville. Elizabeth was christened in St Stephen’s Chapel in Westminster Abbey. Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Duchess of Bedford, and Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, stood as her godmothers and Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, stood as her godfather.

    [Read More...]
  • February 2016 Tudor Life Magazine

    It’s our sex edition … and there are lots of things to discover within February’s Tudor Life magazine. Dare you read on? (Actually you won’t be shocked, but you will learn a lot!)

    [Read More...]
  • Coronation of Elizabeth of York – 25 November 1487

    On 25th November 1487, St Catherine’s Day, Elizabeth of York, consort of Henry VII and mother of one-year-old Arthur Tudor, was crowned queen at Westminster Abbey. As Elizabeth’s biographer Amy Licence explains, her coronation had been postponed due to her pregnancy and then unrest in England.

    [Read More...]
  • The Marriage Bed of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York

    Bed of rosesFrom now until 22nd November 2015, Hever Castle is exhibiting a late medieval bed believed to have been the marriage bed of King Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. It is on loan from the Langley Collection.

    Extensive research has been done regarding the provenance of the bed, including DNA testing of the timber. You can read more about the bed and the research at the following links:

    Also in The Bed of Roses exhibition is a newly purchased 16th Century replica of a painting of Henry VIII by Joos van Cleve. Go to www.hevercastle.co.uk/ to find out more about the castle and visiting it.

  • Tudor Life February 2015 – Lady Jane Grey Special!

    Enjoy this amazing 82 page Lady Jane Grey Special Edition magazine.

    [Read More...]