The Tudor Society
The Tudor Society
  • The White King: Charles I, Traitor, Murderer, Martyr – A review

    I don’t really do book reviews anymore, I leave them to Tudor Society book reviewer Charlie Fenton, but when one of your favourite historians asks you if you’d like a review copy of their next book then you just don’t say no, do you?! Saying no would be rather silly.

    Let me start by saying that I haven’t studied Charles I and the English Civil War since History A’ Level and that’s quite a long time ago now [cough, cough, splutter, splutter]. I hadn’t read a book on his reign since then, so my ideas about Charles I were rather dated, to say the least. I knew that the traditional view of Charles as weak and stupid was probably an unfair one so I was looking forward to reading Leanda de Lisle’s take on this man, particularly as her book on the Grey sisters, “The Sisters Who Would Be Queen”, is one of my all-time favourite history books. If anyone was going to challenge the myths, peel back the layers of propaganda and bad history, and reveal the real man then I was sure it was going to be Leanda.

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  • Discover the Tudors – last few discount tickets available

    If you’ve been thinking about coming on the Discover Tudors Tour, now is the time to book your tickets. The last few discount tickets where you can save £300 per person are only available for a few more days – until 7th February – so BOOK NOW!

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  • Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk (c.1484-1545)

    Charles Brandon was one of King Henry VIII’s most trusted advisors and friends. He married the king’s sister, even when he had been trusted not too, and eventually married a lady thirty-five years younger than him.

    Being someone who was so close to Henry VIII, what was Brandon’s real purpose? What did he achieve in his lifetime? And, how did he rise so high?

    Charles Brandon was born around 1484 and was one of two sons born to Sir William Brandon and Elizabeth Bruyn of South Ockendon. His father was Henry VII’s standard-bearer at the Battle of Bosworth in 1485, which is where he is said to have been killed by Richard III himself. King Henry VII saw how loyal William had been to him, so, therefore, chose to repay this debt by having his son, Charles, brought up at his court. Charles was just two years older than Henry VII’s eldest child, Prince Arthur, but when Arthur married the Spanish princess, Catherine of Aragon, in 1502, Charles did not join them at Ludlow Castle. Instead, he stayed in London and got to know Arthur’s younger brother, Henry, Duke of York.

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  • 1 February – A busy day in Tudor history!

    1 February seems to have been a rather busy day in the Tudor period and here are three events, linked to further reading about them…

    1514 – Henry VIII granted the dukedom of Suffolk to Charles Brandon, his future brother-in-law, and also made Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk, and Howard’s son, also called Thomas, the Earl of Surrey. Charles Somerset was also made Earl of Worcester.

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  • Expert Talk – Natalie Grueninger – The Early Life of Anne Boleyn

    This month’s expert speaker is Natalie Grueninger, author of “Discovering Tudor London” and “In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII”. This talk is all about Anne Boleyn, her lineage, and the ever-fascinating question of when Anne was actually born.

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