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The Tudor Society

An outspoken reformer, Lady Margaret Douglas dies, and a man of “plyable” willow

In the first part of this week in Tudor history, I introduce an outspoken reformer whose works were burnt, I talk about the death of Henry VIII’s niece, Lady Margaret Douglas, and how it was surrounded by rumour, and I give an overview of the life and career of a Tudor administrator who claimed he survived in politics in such turbulent times because he “was made of the plyable willow, not of the stubborn oak”

8th March 1569 - Death of evangelical reformer and Member of Parliament Richard Tracy at Stanway in Gloucestershire. Henry VIII and his council ordered the burning of his works in 1546.

9th March 1578 - Death of sixty-two-year-old Margaret Douglas, Countess of Lennox, niece of Henry VIII, mother of Lord Darnley and grandmother of King James VI/I. Her death was surrounded by rumours of poisoning.

10th March 1572 - Death of nobleman and administrator William Paulet, 1st Marquis of Winchester, at his home Basing House in Hampshire. He was said to be 97 years of age. Pauley managed to serve Henry VIII and all three of his children, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I, and said it was down to him being "made of the plyable willow, not of the stubborn oak”.

Lady Margaret Douglas videos:

ttps://youtu.be/fuWfShWK-rY

Other Tudor history events for these dates:

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An outspoken reformer, Lady Margaret Douglas dies, and a man of “plyable” willow