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The Tudor Society

A literary patron and her husband, a chaplain dies at sea, and a pragmatic reformer pleases nobody

In this second part of This week on Tudor history for the week beginning 22nd February, I introduce a literary patron and her husband, a clergyman who ended up dying on a voyage far from home and being buried at sea, and a famous reformer whose peacemaking and pragmatic approach failed to heal rifts and please people. Oh and he ended up being dug up and posthumously tried for heresy, and burnt!

24th or 25th February 1618 - Death of Elizabeth Carey (née Spencer), Lady Hunsdon. Elizabeth was a renowned literary patron and was one of the Spencers of Althorp.

26th February 1548 - Birth of Elizabeth Carey's husband, Sir George Carey, 2nd Baron Hunsdon, son of Henry Carey, 1st Baron Hunsdon, and grandson of Mary Boleyn.

27th February 1583 - Death of clergyman and diarist Richard Madox at sea, near Espirito Santo harbour, near Vitória, Brazil. Madox was on a trading voyage at the time and kept a diary which is a wonderful source of the lead-up to the voyage and tthe voyage itself.

28th February/1st March 1551 - Death of Martin Bucer, the famous theologian and Protestant reformer at Cambridge. As well as his reform and works, Bucer was known for his peacemaking and pragmatic approach. He had good intentions, wanting to avoid schism, but he ended up not pleasing anyone.

My video on the burning of the remains of Bucer and Fagius:

https://youtu.be/lwVXkWK3q-k​

More "On this day" events for 25-28 February:

https://youtu.be/lQ0nFNgD74s​

https://youtu.be/sS__T7HLURM​

https://youtu.be/QnT2Qp7RuXc​

https://youtu.be/tSH2feVoYHQ​

https://youtu.be/LMEowRAmMns​

https://youtu.be/zsUSrhyWnwA​

https://youtu.be/f3_SnmqCcmk​

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A literary patron and her husband, a chaplain dies at sea, and a pragmatic reformer pleases nobody