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The Tudor Society
  • May 8 – Charles Wriothesley, Elizabeth I’s Acts of Uniformity and Supremacy, and a show of strength

    On this day in Tudor history, 8th May 1508, herald and chronicler Charles Wriothesley was born in London.

    Wriothesley’s chronicle is one of the major primary sources for King Henry VIII’s reign, so let Claire tell you more about its writer, Charles Wriothesley, Windsor Herald, and what heralds actually are.

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  • 6 June – Trouble bews in Bodmin

    On this day in Tudor history, 6th June 1549, an army of rebels assembled at Bodmin in Cornwall, and there was a town meeting in which the rebels’ demands were put forward.

    What were these rebels rebelling against?

    The recent religious changes, particularly the new law concerning the Book of Common Prayer.

    Trouble ensued and their grievances became a full-blown rebellion, the Prayer Book Rebellion. You can find out what happened next and how the rebellion ended in today’s talk.

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  • Elizabeth I, clerical marriage and religion

    On 9th August 1561, while on a visit to Ipswich in Suffolk, Queen Elizabeth I issued injunctions forbidding women to reside in cathedrals and colleges. It was this “on this day” event that made me dig deeper into her injunctions, the reaction to them, and also her religious settlement and “middle way”.

    I hope you enjoy my Claire Chats video talk on this topic.

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  • 8 May – Elizabeth I, her Act of Uniformity and her middle road

    On this day in Tudor history, Queen Elizabeth I gave her approval to the Acts of Uniformity and Supremacy. The Act of Uniformity was incredibly important and it reflected the queen’s wish to follow a middle road where religion was concerned.

    But what was this act? What did it establish? What did Elizabeth want for England and what happened?

    I explain all in today’s video.

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  • 1559 Act of Uniformity

    On this day in history, 8th May 1559, Queen Elizabeth I gave her approval to the Acts of Uniformity and Supremacy which had been passed by Parliament on the 29th April. The Act of Uniformity made Protestantism England’s official faith, established a form of worship which is still followed in English Parish churches today and showed the country that Elizabeth was bent on following a middle road where religion was concerned. The monarch was Head of the Church again, and still is today.

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